My Way: I Am A Bodybuilder

JeremyPatterson-RPS-AlexArdenti-345JJI must admit for the first time since I starting writing for Lifestyle and Strength, this week being my 16th article, I was struggling to find a topic I wanted to write about. I have a fairly lengthy list of ideas available to talk about, but I just wasn’t feeling any of them. You see, every time I think of an idea that I think may be a good idea for an article or a blog I save it on my phone so I won’t forget. My mind is constantly turning and if I don’t write them down immediately they tend to go away forever. Right now as it stands today I have 20 potential topics to write on. It’s just that for some reason none of them were speaking to me this week.

My articles are posted every Friday morning, and even though there is wiggle room I kind of give myself my own deadline to have it turned in by Wednesday night before I go to bed. I can’t work on them in the morning at work anyway so it pretty much is the deadline. As I write this it’s Tuesday night, and I have basketball Wednesday night. It’s the start of the playoffs (PLAYOFFS? In my best Jim Mora voice.) So I know I really need to get most or all of it done tonight.

This is why I am so glad I read an old post by Matt today. I was digging through the archives like I often do and reading up on stuff I missed before I discovered this great site and I came across an article titled Getting Lean Means Paying Attention To Detail. It sparked something on a personal level for me, which also sparked the idea for this article. Specifically it was this line that got me thinking – “I know ‘getting ripped’ is only dealing with a very small portion of those involved in fitness. It’s bodybuilders and fitness competitors mostly. These people are hard-wired (or so it seems) to be locked in to the specifics of their diet.”

It made me realize it’s time to own up to the fact that I’m without a single question in my mind a JeremyPatterson-M&F-Mar2012-ad-259bodybuilder. Some of you who know me well are probably thinking “duh” but seriously I for some reason have never really owned up to being one. I always just considered myself a fitness enthusiast mostly.

It’s not that I’m ashamed to be a bodybuilder by any means, I’m quite proud of it actually. It’s just that I guess when I think of bodybuilders, I think of guys like the impressive JC, who hit the stage and wow with their super lean and muscular bodies far better than mine. I often thought I was “like” a bodybuilder, but never truly thought of myself as being one. Perhaps I never thought I was good enough at it to be considered a bodybuilder. In fact I used to only think of bodybuilders as the monsters you’d see who have arms as big as my thighs (I’m being literal.) Of course that was well before I got so serious about fitness.

To me I think I didn’t see myself as a bodybuilder because I only do it recreationally. I don’t have any plans to ever go on stage at this point in life. I say at this point because I’d never rule anything out and who knows what the future could bring. It’s just something I do for fun and for the health benefits. I don’t do it to get paid or as any part of a job or any kind of competition. I do it because I not only enjoy doing it but I also love the benefits it brings me for my physical and mental health. Yes I do it to look good, but as I’ve talked about in the past it’s about so much more than just looks for me, but that’s a whole different topic all together.

Almost everything I do is to be as lean as possible with good muscle mass and definition. I care about every muscle in my body and I hate any lagging parts (I’m talking about you, you stubborn calves!) I don’t care about how much weight I can lift (anymore) as I’m more concerned about what I need to do for hypertrophy. I have no problem being out-lifted by others anymore either. I just want to do whatever it takes to gain muscle, while staying lean. In fact it’s kind of funny. Originally when I started lifting I thought one of the main benefits of lifting would be to help me with my sports, which it most certainly did for the record. Now I often feel like my sports get in the way of my lifting.

Especially recently my diet has been dialed in big time. To the point where I’m meticulously planning out everything I eat and counting calories and macros and doing jeremy_patterson_abs_hands_hips_hydroxycut_hardcoreeverything I can to hit specific numbers. Prepping meals twice a week so I have everything pre-made and I know what I’m eating all the time. If we are going out I carefully scan the menus and look up all the nutrition information to make sure I make a smart choice. If we go to a party I bring my own meal with me so I’m not either eating something I shouldn’t or not eating at all because there is nothing to eat that fits my specific diet.

I’m watching what I eat and when I eat it and spending a lot of time making sure everything is perfect. This is also why I’m starting to see results like I never have before. My body had gotten used to what I was doing. It worked for a long time, but it finally stalled out. I was still working hard but I wasn’t making improvements, and I always want to improve.

I’m making getting to bed on time a priority because I know that proper sleep is very important for recovering and building muscle. I could go on and on about all the ways proper sleep is important but not right now, maybe another time. The point is while it’s great to get sleep to feel more awake, I’m making a real effort to get more sleep for my results and of course my overall health too.

Lifting and eating and everything that comes along with bodybuilding is constantly on my mind. I’m forever reading up on it and trying to find new ways I can make improvements. I get so excited when I learn new things that I can’t even explain it. Some people view finding out they were doing things that may not have been the best way of doing things as a bummer and get frustrated because they weren’t doing it right. When I learn new things like that I’m thrilled because now I have more tools for better success! Anything that gives me more knowledge and can help me get better results sure sounds like a good thing to me.

I also do it because I enjoy the challenge. Adding lean muscle mass and keeping body fats low is no easy task. If you want to bring up your biceps a 1/2 inch or thicken your chest or say have something that at least resembles calves, you really have to work for it. In fact working for it isn’t even enough. You have to be smart about it. Bodybuilding really is just as much mental as it is physical, and I really do love it. I’ll tell you it sure feels great when you work your butt off and reach your goals. Once I do reach a goal it’s time to start another one!

Well, as you can see almost jeremy-patterson_beverything I do in life seems to revolve around a lifestyle of building muscle and staying lean. If that’s not being a bodybuilder, I don’t know what is. I get tons of remarks about my lifestyle, some funny, some are taken with a grain of salt. I don’t care about them though. I don’t let them bother me. I’m doing this for me and because I love it. If someone else doesn’t understand because it’s not the way they perceive how life should be, that’s not really of concern to me. I do it because I love it, and the benefits that come along with it are endless. I don’t feel like I’m missing out on a thing.

Yes, I Colin DeWaay, am a natural bodybuilder, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Happy Lifting!

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9 comments for “My Way: I Am A Bodybuilder

  1. March 16, 2013 at 8:43 am

    Nice post. I think a lot of people are turned off by the stigma of bodybuilding, but are in fact bodybuilders. If you’re building your body, you’re a bodybuilder. That goes for women too.

    • March 17, 2013 at 8:54 pm

      It’s very true! Took me a long time to accept that. 🙂 Thanks for the comment!

  2. Nathan H.
    March 15, 2013 at 3:59 pm

    Lets just say you have the physique I’ve been pouring all my time into achieving bro. Yes, you are a bodybuilder and its obvious your doing it right. Sleep and counting macros are my biggest weakness’s. Look like I need to get on the Colin Dewaay sleeping proper program. Your doin a good job man.

    • March 15, 2013 at 9:11 pm

      Thanks Nathan I really appreciate that! Sleeping is a tough one. It’s the one I struggle with the most. I’m doing a better job of getting down earlier, but falling asleep is the hard part! Keep working man, you’ll get there! Thanks again!

  3. March 15, 2013 at 2:09 pm

    I’m having my own realization that I’m a bodybuilder too. I like lifting heavy, but I’m more pumped up (no pun intended) by hypertrophy than setting strength PRs and my distaste for other methods of training like crossfit style workouts is helping me realize this. Keep it up!

    • March 15, 2013 at 9:12 pm

      Thanks Mark you too! You are definitely looking great!

      • March 19, 2013 at 2:50 pm

        Thanks man! It’s exciting to keep learning (from people like you) and keep working at it!

  4. March 15, 2013 at 10:26 am

    I know how you feel Colin. I think part of what makes accepting it so hard is that there are a very visible minority of bodybuilders who we don’t want to associate ourselves with, and calling ourselves one when we aren’t pyjama, fanny pack, spaghetti strap muscle shirt wearing, uh, meatheads, makes including ourselves in that circle sort of embarrassing. If that’s how you want to present yourself, go for it. It doesn’t bother me, but there is more to bodybuilding than doing all of your clothes shopping at a supplement store. Just saying…

    • March 15, 2013 at 11:42 am

      You know I didn’t even think of that originally but I think you’re onto something there. I definitely try to avoid those stereotypes for sure. Not that I have any problems with those that are like that. It’s just not me!

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